Next Generation Disc Golfer

Image of kids watching dad throw a disc
“Next Generation Disc Golfer”, 8×10”, acrylic

While Dad and I were playing disc golf with friends, one of them brought his brother’s family with two kids. Both the wife and husband were pretty good disc golfers and their kids watched intently, the oldest eager to give it a try. As they watched the Dad, the sunlight caught their blond hair and I saw a painting I really wanted to try. Covertly, I snapped a pic with the iPhone. Later at home I painted the two kids omitting the Dad in the background. Might have made for a neat story to have him back there, but I thought the disc in the toddler’s hand told the story sufficiently.

Hopefully, the young couple will enjoy their painting as much as I enjoyed painting it!

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October in Marblehead

The leaves are changing and pumpkins are out along the front yard walls in Marblehead. I saw this riding my bike around town and it seemed like it’d make for a cool fall-style painting. It’s one of those you can put up temporarily for the month as a fall celebration. I think I’ll add a few maple leaves to finish it off in the studio.

The Old Homestead Oak, TimeLapse

 

There is an old homestead on my uncle’s property from the early to mid 1900’s we call “the bed and breakfast”, that has a gigantic oak outside of it with deep ridges and enormous, winding arms spreading about 100 feet for a canopy. I wanted to zero in on the trunk this time and had fun with another TimeLapse. If you can think of anything you’d want me to include in the YouTube videos, please let me know in the comments, thanks!!

I’m steadily gaining energy back after a round of chemo and letting myself drop down to seriously low weight, so I’m hoping the adventures at different state parks will soon be underway!

Video TimeLapse for Painting

I started wanting to share the experience of what it like painting en plein air more and figured I’d try my hand at making videos that wrap up the journey in about a minute. My equipment is really extravagant. It’s a phone with an app called “TimeLapse” and a $20 Amazon tripod. My other equipment is my highly modified Walmart easel and canvas panels from Hobby Lobby. My video taking skills are even more extravagant! Ha. It’s all part of the fun. My brother is a marketing/design genius and helps me know what format videos to post where. Right now, it’s about 1min. per TimeLapse. Later, I made a YouTube channel that will have more scenes of the area I’m painting to bring a closer experience of being there. We’ll see how that goes. The more people I can inspire to get outside and enjoy the beauty of nature, the better! Whenever it is my time to leave this Earth, that’s what I want to leave behind. I love a quote I just recently read in scripture where Jesus said to God,”Glorify your Son so I can glorify you.”. That makes so much sense. We have a purpose. If we were given a gift (music, art, acting, caregiving, …) and we love this unimaginably awesome experience called “life” (which I think of as at least part of the mystery of God), we get to be ourselves, expressing our thanks for being a part of it. How cool is that?

Here’s a link to the last video I made: https://youtu.be/cSo9PsGDF6Y. You can also click the picture above as a link.

Studio: “Into Reality” Mt. LeConte, NC

“Into Reality” acrylic 11×14″

My cousin Andy and his wife backpack to a lodge in Mt. Le Conte n the Appalachian Mountains. It has a special meaning to them as their getaway hike and he took a snapshot of his wife walking into view of the mountains. This painting will be a good “happy unbirthday” surprise. He’s been wanting this painting for some time and I finally felt ready to paint it. 

I’ve been learning about Impressionism and manipulating color, value, edge… all the aspect the affect the mood of the scene. When backpacking through the woods its been called the “long green tunnel”. After a few miles, it’s meditative as you listen your rhythmic footsteps, the sounds of the forest, your breathe and you fall into introspection of life. Then, BAM, bright light hits you and an overwhelming view of the mountains appears. It’s a sudden jolt internally to go from introspection to such awareness of life outside of you. Humbling. Everything thought about for miles snaps into proportion, so teeny-tiny in comparison. Appreciation. It’s no question that this life is a gift, and being a part of it, however infinitely small, is incredibly comforting. These are the words and feelings behind the painting that guided my decisions. Hope they like it! 

Plein Air: Belton, TX along Nolan Ceek

“Playful Moments”, acrylic on paper, 8″x6″ish.
June in Texas is a game of dodging thunderstorms! I saw blue in the sky and actual shadows on the ground, so I headed out to paint along Nolan Creek that runs through the middle of Belton, TX. Everyone and their dog (literally) was in the river tubing, feeding the geese and getting a nice sun burn. 


I wanted to express that great feeling of sunlight and sense of fun along the creek bank and snapped a few photos from my phone of the geese. Right then a girl that had been feeding the geese walked down to the water with the geese following. I quickly set up, did a few 1 minute sketches of the geese and gesture of the girl as practice, took ten minutes to do a small thumbnail color map (blobs of color next to each other to see the relationships), and dug into the sketch. I wanted the feeling of sunlight to fill the painting, so I toned the paper with a watered down yellow and layer down paint over that. It peeks through in areas nicely. After spending about twenty minutes roughly filling in the background and grass, keeping it somewhat abstract, I filled the geese and kid in from the pic on my phone with enough detail and form to add a sense of realism. It’s so much fun! It feels like it adds movement and life into the sketch getting a bit closer the the feel of being there. 

One hour later … dark skies, rain and thunder. Ha. 


HONK! Goose for see ya next time (and you better bring bread).

Plein Air: Chalk Ridge Falls

This is an area along the river in Chalk Ridge Falls in Belton, TX,  a local hot spot for me where I can explore and consistently find something to study. Rivers, creeks, grasslands, rocks, caves… it has it all.  Plus, it felt great to paint over a previous painting that flopped big time. 

What initially struck me about the scene was the deep curelean blue sky against all of the greens of the land and the shadow of the main bush cast over the sandy ledge. It’s always a challenge to get the right value (darkness) and color of the shadows to coordinate with the sun-lit areas. When it’s right, it’s seamless and the eye just accepts it. The temps are rising as summer approaches and soon enough that green grass will tan. You can bet I’ll be huddled under a tree somewhere out there, thankful for the shade and living in the moment.  

Studio Painting: “Countryside Bluebonnets”

This will be a quick post, but wanted to share the most recent work done in the studio. If it looks slightly familiar, it’s because it is from a couple of past plein air studies and a bit of inspiration from a Clyde Aspevig painting all smacked together. Nice when that works out! I added some thick paint in areas of the foreground bluebonnets and let the detail fade away as it went to the background. Hopefully this will feel inviting, like stepping into the scene. I had an email from someone asking to buy artwork in the range this would sell at. Crossing my fingers!

I’m at a paintout near Ennis, TX with the Outdoor Painter Society,  texting this in my tent. Hope to meet some great artists tomorrow!

Plein Air: McKinney Falls State Park

“McKinney Falls State Park, Lower Falls” Acrylic on panel, 9×12
The Austin Plein Air group painted at McKinney Falls State Park and four people showed despite clouds that looked as if they might dump at any minute. I’m glad I risked it! McKinney Falls is in South Austin and a treasure trove of scenes to paint. Onion Creek runs through the park and has carved out the limestone bedrock  along the way. Not only is the creek scenic, but the hike and bike paths (about 9 miles) are too. 

This scene above is the “Lower Falls” and, as you can see, it’s a popular getaway for Austinites. When I was about 80% done, a Girl Scout troop was checking out the Falls and huddled behind me to quietly watch the painting progress. When I came to a finishing point and said, “I think it’s about finished!”, one of the girls said, “Not yet, you need a tree here (pointing to the spot on the painting), some green algae on the rocks here, here and here and a darker shadow behind this waterfall.”. She wasn’t being rude in her tone of voice, but more like asking me to look again. I looked and she was right! The indication of a tree to the left side was great for the design, the green algae gave excellent highlights to the focal point and the darker shadow really emphasized what the painting was about. She couldn’t put it into words why she knew, but she did. I gave her compliments and a high five. A couple of them added dots for the heads and feet of the people. We had a great time! It’s a great reminder that all the books, videos, lectures and demos might help me to understand design, but before all of that massive amount of information, just simply looking at the Falls and seeing “beauty” is a gift we’re born with. So humbling and inspiring! 

I recently heard an interview with a famous artist that part of what makes a professional artist, professional, is consistency. I need to choose a style and subject to run with and produce enough that a gallery can count on me to continue this. That way collectors can become acquainted with my work and know what to expect. Maybe creeks, rivers and paths in the state parks can be my “theme”. Something both collectors and I can connect with together. Just some thoughts…

Great day! 

Memory Sketch: Rose Redmond (Tyler, TX)

Rose Redmond Dog Walkers (acrylic/paper, ~4×6″)
Tyler, an East Texas city about 2 hours west of Dallas, is brilliant in spring. It has deep, rich, red sandy soil with grass that’s always green and trees that reach 50 to 70 feet all over the city. Rose Redmond park is it’s central park with paved paths for joggers, bikers, and tons of dog walkers. It’s always in use. The paths cut through a forest with trees so high, the path is almost always in shade. As I was jogging, I’d come to sections where I’m in the shade and a bright sunlit portion would be ahead. I could feel the warmth just from looking at it. At a few points I simply stopped and spent a minute to mentally try and paint the scene in my mind. I constantly say to myself, “If this was created by God, what brush did he have and what kind of strokes did he use?”. I’ve noticed lately from the Nathan Fowkes class in Schoolism, he says “What is the simple statement? What are the main colors and how do they compare: lighter, darker, warmer, cooler?”. When I begin this conversation (not out loud), all the color combinations pop out and a game plan forms as if I was setting up the easel for the hundredth time. The simple statement of this scene was about the bright warm glow of the sunlit tress and it’s connection to the people walking through it. That’s it. It’s not about the individual trees, not the grass or even the path, just the light and the people. As long as the proportions are mostly correct, the abstract patterns make sense. This is definitely the impression (feel) of the memory I had, which is just as real as the scene itself. Fun!